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Robert Ivy: CEO and Architect

While school and job training can help workers learn what they need to do their job, professional organizations can offer a lot more. They recruit workers and have educational programs. They have resources that help people who are new to the workplace. They hold annual conferences that let workers meet leaders from their field. Members consider this a big bonus to belonging to these organizations. Connections made at these conferences let people know about available jobs and offers. Networking at these conferences forms relationships that can help members find jobs. These organizations offer members access to job boards that are hosted by associations and maybe some of their staff members. Visit on his twitter for latest updates.

Being a member of a professional organization can give you credibility. It shows employers that you’re committed and have leadership skills. Having society awards will expose both you and your resume. Being a member of an association can cost anywhere from 50 to 1000 dollars. Some workers pay for the membership themselves, while others have their employers pay for them.

Robert Ivy is the CEO of the American Institute of Architects. He has been the CEO since 2011. He is also practicing to be an architect. Robert Ivy was awarded the Noel Polk Lifetime Achievement Award by the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters, or MIAL. He is the first architect to receive this award.

Before AIA, Robert Ivy was the editor in chief of Architectural Record. He received the National Magazine Award along with several other awards. He was named a Master Architect by Alpha Rho Chi, an architecture fraternity. He has a BA in English from Sewanee: The University of the South and a Master’s of Architecture from Tulane University. He published the biography “Fay Jones: Architect” in 2001, which now has a third edition. Robert Ivy is considered the best architect in Mississippi.

Learn more: https://www.metropolismag.com/ideas/architects-and-the-public-health-imperative/

 

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